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Improving crop yield stability by intercropping (ReMIX Practice abstract)

{Tool} Improving crop yield stability by intercropping (ReMIX Practice abstract). Creator(s): Jensen, Erik Steen and Chongtham, Raj. Issuing Organisation(s): SLU - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, IFOAM EU. ReMIX Practice abstracts, no. 2. (2020)

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Document available online at: https://www.remix-intercrops.eu/content/download/4086/38970/version/1/file/%232%20Improving%20crop%20yield%20stability%20by%20intercropping%20%20.pdf


Summary

Outcome
In 2018, pea and oat in sole and intercrop were exposed to severe drought. On intercropped fields, the peas did not survive, but the oat harvest was 86 % of the oat sole crop yield.
Practical recommendations
• Intercropping is highly relevant for grain legume production in organic farming systems, other low input systems, but also conventional systems.
• Over three years of conventional field experiments, sole cropped peas yield variability was more than twice that of barley.
• N-fertilization reduced the yield variation in barley.
• The of the intercrop’s yield was moderate compared to the sole crops.
• Intercropping can have a major economic impact at the farm scale, especially in drought years, by ensuring a certain amount of production under environmental stresses.
• Farmers also benefit from additional advantages of inter-cropping.
Practical testing/ Farmers’ experiences
Farmers or advisory organizations interested in determining the stabilizing effect of intercropping in stressful environments can monitor grain yields of sole crops and intercrops over at least three years and determine the variation.


EPrint Type:Practice tool
Teaser:Intercropping improves crop yield stability and resilience to biotic and abiotic stresses.
What problem does the tool address?:Extreme weather, biotic stresses and field-scale variability in soil quality increases the risk of crop yield losses in global sole crop production systems.
What solution does the tool offer?:Intercropping is the simultaneous cultivation of more than one species on the same field. One crop in a mixture may compensate for the eventual loss of another crop.
Country:Sweden
Type of Practice Tool:Practice abstracts
Keywords:cropping systems, diversification, arable farming, low input agriculture, intercropping, cereal crops, legumes
Agrovoc keywords:
Language
Value
URI
English
cropping systems
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_1971
English
diversification
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_2344
English
arable farming
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_36528
English
low input agriculture
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_34370
English
intercropping
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_3910
English
cereal crops
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_25512
English
legumes
http://aims.fao.org/aos/agrovoc/c_4255
Subjects: Crop husbandry > Crop combinations and interactions
Crop husbandry > Production systems > Cereals, pulses and oilseeds
Research affiliation: European Union > Horizon 2020 > Remix
International Organizations > International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements IFOAM > IFOAM EU Group
Sweden > Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)
H2020 or FP7 Grant Agreement Number:727217
Related Links:https://www.remix-intercrops.eu/, https://www.slu.se/en/, https://www.organicseurope.bio
Deposited By: De Simone, Dr. Ambra
ID Code:38550
Deposited On:21 Apr 2021 12:25
Last Modified:10 May 2021 11:30
Document Language:English
Status:Published

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