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From Clean & Green to Organic: Opportunities and Impediments to Achieving an Organic Tasmania

Paull, John (2017) From Clean & Green to Organic: Opportunities and Impediments to Achieving an Organic Tasmania. In: School of Land and Food Research Conference.

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Summary

Tasmania enjoys a reputation as clean and green. It offers an apparent good fit with a vision of organic production as well as some natural advantages. Tasmania’s moratorium on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is an advantage for organic production.This paper presents some context for the progress of Tasmania from the puffery of ‘clean and green’ to the standard of organic. Australia leads the world accounting for 45% of the world’s certified organic agricultural land (22.69 m ha of 50.92 m ha.). Tasmania has been an early mover as an advocate of organics with organised advocacy dating from 1946. Despite this enthusiasm, Tasmania only accounts for 0.01% of Australia’s certified organic agricultural land and 4% of Australia’s certified organic producers. Organic accounts for just 0.2% of Tasmania’s agricultural land. Tasmania’s leading organic company does not use Tasmanian ingredients. The organic chocolate products of Cadbury are made in Poland. Recent initiatives in organic and conversion to organic are presented along with some international initiatives of regional conversion to organic.


EPrint Type:Conference paper, poster, etc.
Type of presentation:Paper
Keywords:Tasmania, Australia, organic farming, organic agriculture, development, growth, GMO moratorium
Subjects: Farming Systems > Social aspects
"Organics" in general > Countries and regions > Australia
"Organics" in general > Countries and regions > China
"Organics" in general > History of organics
Knowledge management
Research affiliation: Australia > University of Tasmania
Deposited By: Paull, Dr John
ID Code:31774
Deposited On:14 Aug 2017 11:43
Last Modified:14 Aug 2017 11:43
Document Language:English
Status:Published
Refereed:Not peer-reviewed

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