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Assessing the Microbiota of Black Soldier Fly Larvae (Hermetia illucens) Reared on Organic Waste Streams on Four Different Locations at Laboratory and Large Scale

Wyants, E.; Frooninckx, L.; Crauwels, S.; Verreth, C.; De Smet, J.; Sandrock, C.; Wohlfahrt, J.; Van Schelt, J.; Depraetere, S.; Lievens, B.; Van Miert, S.; Claes, J. and Van Campenhout, L. (2018) Assessing the Microbiota of Black Soldier Fly Larvae (Hermetia illucens) Reared on Organic Waste Streams on Four Different Locations at Laboratory and Large Scale. Microbial Ecology, online, pp. 1-18.

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Summary

This study aimed to gain insight into the microbial quality, safety and bacterial community composition of black soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens) reared at different facilities on a variety of organic waste streams. For seven rearing cycles, both on laboratory-scale and in large-scale facilities at several locations, the microbiota of the larvae was studied. Also samples of the substrate used and the residue (= leftover substrate after rearing, existing of non-consumed substrate, exuviae and faeces) were investigated. Depending on the sample, it was subjected to plate counting, Illumina Miseq sequencing and/or detection of specific food pathogens. The results revealed that the substrates applied at the various locations differed substantially in microbial numbers as well as in the bacterial community composition. Furthermore, little similarity was observed between the microbiota of the substrate and that of the larvae reared on that substrate. Despite substantial differences between the microbiota of larvae reared at several locations, 48 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were shared by all larvae, among which most belonged to the phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Although the substrate is assumed to be an important source of bacteria, our results suggest that a variety of supposedly interacting factors-both abiotic and biotic-are likely to affect the microbiota in the larvae. In some larvae and/or residue samples, potential foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella and Bacillus cereus were detected, emphasising that decontamination technologies are required when the larvae are used in feed, just as for other feed ingredients, or eventually in food.


EPrint Type:Journal paper
Keywords:Hermetia illucens, Microbiota, Laboratory scale, Industrial scale, High-throughput sequencing, Plate counts, Innovation, Animal feeding, Protein supply
Subjects: Food systems > Food security, food quality and human health
Animal husbandry > Feeding and growth
Knowledge management > Research methodology and philosophy
Food systems > Produce chain management
Research affiliation: Switzerland > FiBL - Research Institute of Organic Agriculture Switzerland > Animal Husbandry and Breeding
Switzerland > FiBL - Research Institute of Organic Agriculture Switzerland > Aquaculture
ISSN:Print ISSN: 0095-3628, Online-ISSN 1432-184X
DOI:10.1007/s00248-018-1286-x
Deposited By: Sandrock, Dr. Christoph
ID Code:34696
Deposited On:26 Feb 2019 08:45
Last Modified:28 Feb 2020 08:52
Document Language:English
Status:Published
Refereed:Peer-reviewed and accepted

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