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Auxin-mediated relationships between apple plants and root inhabiting fungi: impact on root pathogens and potentialities of growth-promoting populations.

Manici, L.; Kelderer, M.; Caputo, F. and Mazzola, M. (2014) Auxin-mediated relationships between apple plants and root inhabiting fungi: impact on root pathogens and potentialities of growth-promoting populations. Plant Pathology, early (view), pp. 1-9. [In Press]

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Online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppa.12315/abstract

Summary

This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between plant hosts and root-colonizing fungi recovered from apple orchard soils that had been replanted over multiple generations. Functional relationships of three groups of filamentous fungi (Ceratobasidium sp., Cylindrocarpon-like group and Fusarium acuminatum) with apple rootstocks were evaluated
in plant growth bioassays. The Cylindrocarpon-like group and Ceratobasidium sp. showed a relationship with the host plant varying from pathogenic to commensal through to mutualistic for the latter group, while that of F. acuminatum tended to be mutualistic. Seven fungal isolates of each group, which induced the highest plant growth in bioassays, were evaluated for auxin (IAA) and gibberellin (GA3 and GA4) production in culture filtrate. All isolates of F. acuminatum as well as most of those of the Ceratobasidium sp. and ylindrocarpon-like groups produced IAA in culture filtrate.
IAA production was evaluated for additional isolates of endophytic fungal species from fruit tree orchards and the functionality of IAA was confirmed by growing in vitro micropropagated plantlets of apple rootstock on MS medium
supplemented with fungal culture filtrate. Findings from his study may explain the difficulty in defining the recise role of diverse root-colonizing fungal populations in replant disease aetiology of fruit tree orchards. However, the results demonstrate the presence of a positive and widely available biotic component of the orchard soil biology that may be exploited for the benefit of tree growth and production.


EPrint Type:Journal paper
Subjects: Crop husbandry > Soil tillage
Environmental aspects > Biodiversity and ecosystem services
Crop husbandry > Crop health, quality, protection
Research affiliation: European Union > CORE Organic II > BIO-INCROP
ISSN:1365-3059
DOI:10.1111/ppa.12315
Deposited By: Manici, dr Luisa M.
ID Code:27805
Deposited On:21 Nov 2014 16:19
Last Modified:21 Nov 2014 16:19
Document Language:English
Status:In Press
Refereed:Peer-reviewed and accepted

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